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Old 11-09-2005, 05:58 PM
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Dodge Dart (4th gen) 1966-1976

Fourth generation (1966–1976)
Engines
The 170 cu in (2.8 L) Slant-6 engine remained standard equipment, though its power rating rose from 101 bhp (75 kW) to 115 bhp (86 kW) for 1967, owing to the installation of the 225 engine's larger carburetor and the revised camshaft the bigger engine had received in 1965. For North American domestic-market vehicles, the base 170 engine was replaced for 1970 with a stronger new 198 cu in (3.2 L) version of the slant-6. This new base engine was also less costly to make, for unlike the previous 170 engine, the 198 used the same block as the 225. The smaller displacement was achieved with a new crankshaft (3.64 in (92 mm) stroke vs. the 4.125 in (104.8 mm) stroke of the 225 crank) and connecting rods (7.006 in (178.0 mm) long vs. the 6.67 in (169 mm) rods in the 225).[19] Nevertheless, the 225 remained an upgrade option. The 2-barrel 273 cu in (4.5 L) small-block V8 was supplanted on the option list in 1968 by a 318 cu in (5.2 L) 2-barrel engine. The 318 was rated at 230 bhp (170 kW) versus the 2-barrel carbureted 273's 180 bhp (130 kW). At the same time the 4-barrel carbureted 273 235 bhp (175 kW) was replaced on the options list by the 275 bhp (205 kW) 4-barrel carbureted 340 cu in (5.6 L) available only in the 1968–1972 Swinger and the hottest Dart, the performance-oriented GTS models. The Dart GTS came standard with the 340 cu in (5.6 L) V8. A 300 hp (220 kW) 383 cu in (6.3 L) big-block was optional.

1967
The Dart and its sister model—the Plymouth Valiant—were substantially redesigned for the 1967 model year. In addition to new styling, the cars received revised steering systems, wider front track and frame rail spacing, and redesigned K-members capable of accepting larger engines. The Dart would keep this basic form, with facelifts consisting of revised front and rear end styling and interior trim, until the end of A-body production in 1976 for North America and 1981 for South America. The restyled Dart for 1967 featured a rear window with compound inverse curves. This created a unique appearance at the rear of the greenhouse, but tended to collect snow and created thick C-pillars that looked formal but created blindspots for drivers. Curved side glass was used for the first time on a Chrysler compact. Up front, there was a new dual-plane front end contour: the center section of the grille, bumper and leading edge of the hood were recessed from the front plane of the car. The single headlamps were placed forward of the recessed center section, defining the front plane. Park/turn lamps were set into the grille, in the corners formed by the transition area between the recessed and forward sections. This same front end treatment, with minor cosmetic changes to the grille and the park/turn lamps relocated to the front bumper, was also used by Chrysler Australia for their 1967 VE-model Valiant.

With the new design, changes were made to the Dart lineup, beginning with the elimination of its station wagons and the base model's "170" designation. The only body styles were the 2- and 4-door sedans, the hardtop, and the convertible. The base 170 model was now badged simply as "Dart". The 270 and GT versions carried on unchanged for the most part. In late 1967, the GTS model debuted but was built in limited quantities due to its lateness in the model year; the 1968 GTS would be, arguably, improved by fitting the new high-output 340 cu in (5.6 L) V8 as standard equipment. The 1967 Dart, along with all other 1967 Chrysler products, got a new dual-circuit brake hydraulic system to ensure loss of pressure in the front brakes would not prevent the rear brakes from working, and vice versa. The system also incorporated a brake system fault telltale on the dashboard.Other changes to comply with new federal safety laws included collapsible steering columns, additional padding on the dashboard and sunvisors. Shoulder belt anchors were also provided for front outboard occupants. The 1967 redesign removed all traces of the older Virgil Exner styling that proved less popular by the early 1960s. The newer body was trimmer and proved extremely popular, causing sales of the Dart to surpass compacts from Ford and GM.

1968
Changes for 1968 were relatively subtle. The park and turn lights in the grille were moved slightly inboard and made round. Side marker lights were added to the front fenders and rear quarter panels, to comply with newly introduced Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108. Shoulder harnesses (separate, this year and until 1973, from the lap belts) and non-glare matte finish on the windshield wiper arms were also part of the 1968 federally mandated safety package. Chrysler's "Clean Air Package" emission control system became standard equipment on cars sold in all 50 states.[22] The steering linkage was revised again, as were the windshield and rear window gaskets and trim-lock strips, leaving the 1967 pieces as one-year-only items. The standard rear axle ratio was dropped from 2.93 to 2.76 with all standard-performance engines and automatic transmission. Part-throttle downshift functionality was added as a refinement to the TorqueFlite automatic transmission in 6-cylinder cars, to retain acceptable city performance with the taller rear axle.

Hemi Dart
A limited option for 1968 only, code L023, were the Hurst-reworked Hemi Darts, using the 426 Hemi engine. These special models (only 80 were made) were created strictly for drag racing, and included a non-warranty disclaimer. On February 20, 1968, corporate headquarters in Highland Park, Michigan, sent out a press release to Dodge dealerships across the country. It was a promotional pitch purposed at selling drag ready, Hemi powered Darts. The press release stated that Dodge wanted to make a factory built and ready drag racer out of the 68 Dart GTS hardtop for competition in class B Super Stock (drag racing). Engineers stated the new Hemi Dart would reach speeds of 130 mph (209 km/h) in less than 11 seconds and 1⁄4 mi (402 m) times in the 10-11 second range, although times have been reported as low as the 9-10 second range.

To keep weight low, a fiberglass hood and fenders were used. The hood featured a functional intake scoop and four hood pins for full lift off removal of the hood. Lightweight acid dipped steel doors with thin side window glass were used. As the doors lacked a window mechanism, a strap was attached to the bottom of the glass on the interior door-panel. To keep glass up, the strap latched to the inside of the door. The interior included only two bucket seats from a Dodge van. Center console, heater, sound deadeners, side view mirrors, radio, carpeting, and even armrests were deleted to save weight. The engine was a race-spec Hemi 426 cu in (7.0 L). These motors had a compression ratio of 10.25:1 pistons, bore x stroke 4 1⁄4 in 3 3⁄4 in (108.0 mm 95.3 mm) fed through a 2X4-barrel Holley carburetors atop a lightweight crossram aluminum intake manifold rated at 425 hp (431 PS; 317 kW) @ 5,000 rpm and a maximum torque of 490 lb⋅ft (664 N⋅m) @ 4,000 rpm.[25][26] A high-performance Mopar battery was moved to the trunk to free up room and improve weight distribution.

Darts could be ordered wither either a four-speed manual or three-speed automatic transmissions. Manual transmission equipped cars, code A-833, featured a Dana 931/44 built heavy duty axle with a 4.88 gear ratio, heavy duty clutch, steel bellhousing, and special torque shaft and pivots. Manual transmissions were modified by removing synchronizers which lowered the chances of missed shifts. A Hurst floor mounted shifter came standard. The automatic transmissions were the then new Chrysler built 727 TorqueFlite three speed with 831/44 inch large stem pinion center section with a 4.86 gear set, and a 2,600rpm high speed torque converter. They were also modified with a floor mounted Hurst shifter for manual shifting. Other features include heavy duty rear shocks, heavy duty radiator with seven blade fan to keep it cool, deep groove pulleys, a high capacity oil pump, solid-lifter cam, and a roller timing chain to reduce stretch and provide more reliable performance. A transistorized dual points breaker distributor coupled with a Prestolite ignition and solid core wires was also used. The cars weighed approximately 3,000 lb (1,361 kg). The cars were designed to meet street legal requirements, but due to the modifications, the cars came with disclaimers that they were not for street use, but rather "supervised acceleration trials", or drag racing.

Source: Wikipedia

Dodge Dart threads:
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Dodge Dart (1st gen) 1959-1961
Dodge Dart (2nd gen) 1961-1962
Dodge Dart (3rd gen) 1962-1966
Dodge Dart (4th gen) 1966-1976
Dodge Dart (PF) 2012-2017

Last edited by Man of Steel; 09-19-2019 at 10:11 PM.
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